W3Schools: Firefox marches on in 2008!

I note that W3Schools.com posted their browser info for January, so I updated the graph. Firefox appears to continue its rise at the expense of IE6. Removing the WGA in October didn’t seem to have any effect. Is the out of place look-and-feel in XP a bigger issue? The rendering engine changes? Has basically everyone who was going to switch to IE7 on XP already done so? One wonders if the very slow (but steady) rise in IE7 usage over the last 10 months or so is due primarily to Vista adoption. There’s a scary thought for Microsoft. Let’s compare with the OS stats:

May 2007: 2.8% Vista, 19.2% IE7
January 2008: 7.3% Vista, 21.2% IE7

Change: +4.5% Vista, +2.0% IE7

So yes, it is entirely possible that all the IE7 growth is due to Vista… and yet if we are generous and attribute all of IE7’s growth to Vista (rather than XP+Vista), that implies that 5 of every 9 new Vista users visiting that site dumped IE7. Ouch. That does not bode well for IE’s future.

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5 Responses to “W3Schools: Firefox marches on in 2008!”

  1. bdjnk Says:

    ‘5 of every 9 new Vista users visiting that site dumped IE7.’ This doesn’t surprise me at all. Every geek and his mother uses Firefox, and they are more then willing, perhaps even eager, to set it up for every friend that they have. And who doesn’t have at least one geek friend?

    The real question in my mind is why Opera gets no love. I use Firefox in both Vista and Linux for the downloadhelper and customizegoogle extensions, but for regular browsing Opera is superior by far. It is more secure, faster, takes less system resource, and complies with more of the web standards.

    As it so happens I also use IE7 and IE6, but mostly for testing purposes.

  2. Limulus Says:

    “The real question in my mind is why Opera gets no love.”

    I’ve wondered about that. I suspect a few factors:

    – for the longest time, Opera was either not-gratis or ad-ware. That would have turned people off it; not everyone knows its gratis now.

    – Firefox is the descendant of Netscape. Everybody loved Netscape before IE took over. Not so many people heard of Opera, even though it was around back then (I recall trying it and not liking it way back when :)

    – Opera is closed source; all the cool projects are open source now ;)

    – Other than Nintendo, who bundles Opera?

    – Extreme customization in Firefox is possible; sure Opera does lots of stuff, but can you shape it into the browser that you actually want?

    Personally, I would love to see Opera’s market share increase. The more independent codebases exist, the healthier the internet will be (see my post https://limulus.wordpress.com/2007/05/08/security-isnt-just-avoiding-microsoft-but-it-helps/)

  3. SneakyWho_am_i Says:

    I live and breathe these stats (which is a bad thing, as admitted in warnings on sites like w3schools) and was very excited when Firefox finally outshone IE6 there.

    Of course it’s a webmaster’s site – computer illiterates won’t be very well represented (do they even matter in this context?)

    “Every geek and his mother uses Firefox” – damn. My mother uses Firefox. So does everybody at work now, I’m in charge of it and I basically said I won’t allow bandwidth to be wasted accidentally downloading porn, virusware, adware and spyware. If they want to be forced to download that rubbish, they can do it at home on their own time and their own internet bill.

    “Opera was either not-gratis or ad-ware. That would have turned people off it;” – yeah that certainly turned me off of it. I remembered that Opera:
    – was ugly
    – was slow
    – couldn’t load web pages properly
    Wow, boy oh boy things have sure changed since then.

    I’m in love with Opera’s CSS support (uh, mostly), and the fact that it comes with http pipelining turned on by default. I use it often.

    “Opera does lots of stuff, but can you shape it into the browser that you actually want?” Nope. And that’s why I use Opera “often” – I use Firefox for my regular, day to day browsing. Again it comes down to being forced to download things I don’t want.

    Both are excellent browsers. I’ve maintained for some time that you should support any IE user’s decision/temptation to move to Opera. Or Safari. Definitely. Don’t EVER say “No, stay away from Opera, Firefox is better” – that’s just plain stupid. As long as Internet Explorer shapes up or ships out, we’ve won as webmasters. Confusing people about which free browser to use is just going to decrease the probability of a conversion.

    “Personally, I would love to see Opera’s market share increase. The more independent codebases exist, the healthier the internet will be” DAMN RIGHT!!!! my sentiments exactly.
    Besides, although the Mozilla team are excellent and have sound moral principles now, how many of them will remain in fifteen years? Do we really want to see Mozilla win the browser war with a 98% dominance and then stop developing the browser? Nuh-uh. Of course that will never happen for obvious reasons, but having a healthy and level playing field will be a key factor driving innovation and quality, so it’s in our best interests to promote ANY Browser which has an advanced enough renderer to allow us to make innovative, quality sites.

    Right now it’s too hard to do that, because we have to do everything twice. Once for Virus Explorer and once for Proper browsers.

    The day is certainly coming though. Firefox looks set to single handedly topple the worst browser around very soon!!!

    Firefox use according to those stats is growing at about 1% per month versus only maybe 0.2 percent per month in the fastest growing Microsoft browser version.
    I find that very encouraging; the war is practically won.

  4. ODF vs MSXML adoption « Limulus Says:

    […] of the two XML formats and the rate at which the old MS Office ones are abandoned. Much as MS faces IE7 adoption issues vs Firefox AND IE6, they will face the biggest hurdle from getting people to abandon old versions of Office.  If you […]

  5. W3Schools: March Data « Limulus Says:

    […] has increased by 0.8%, in the last month but the number of IE7 users has only gone up by 0.4%; this reinforces the implication that pretty much all of the IE7 growth can be attributed to sales of Vista machines […]

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